EDC with the Groove Belt from Groove Life

Okay, maybe I rolled my eyes a little when I got an email about the Groove Belt. Because I wondered what the folks that make rubber wedding bands could possibly know about making a quality belt. Turns out, they know a lot. Then I thought, yeah, but I’m sure it’s not sturdy enough for EDC use. I was wrong about that too. So I tried one. And just like that, I have a new favorite belt. It will definitely keep your pants up, but it’s also an excellent option for those that carry.

Construction

First, their 37mm webbing is some clearly magical proprietary material. Seriously. I couldn’t find any details on it, but it’s strong, and yet, has a tiny bit of stretch. That bit of stretch makes a difference when you’ve got your favorite carry piece tucked into your pants. And despite being a thin belt, it doesn’t curl or fold over on itself. Thin and light, yet durable. Really, I don’t care what it’s made of (unless unicorns were harmed in making it), it just works.

The Groove Belt from Groove Life

The Groove Belt from Groove Life

Using neodymium magnets and A380 aluminum to make a buckle seems so simple, I don’t know why I’ve never seen this before. I’m sure they exist, just not applied in this manner. Really smart design combines the holding power of crazy strong magnets with simple latches. It’s light, easy to use, and much more secure than a belt even needs to be. This connection feels more like a strap used to pull stuck Fords out of the mud (with a Toyota, of course) than holding up your pants.

More on the webbing

The belt has something called Stiff-Tech. It may actually be Viagra for belts. Vertically, it is more than adequate for supporting your EDC Colt Dragoon revolver, or any lesser firearm. No sag, no roll. Yet horizontally, it has a bit of give. Not enough to make your pants fall down with that heavy gat. No, it’s more like a belt that knows you like the occasional “dos manos” burrito for lunch. Or all you can eat sushi dinners. So there’s just enough stretch to stay comfortable when you stuff your face. Or you know, just being active. If you operate dynamically, it’s got your six.

A closer look at the buckle

Latches can work well, but they require some sort of tension. Magnets have good holding power, and are difficult to pull apart. But they can slide apart much easier. The Groove Belt combines the two for a very strong 45mm tall buckle with no moving parts. Get the two pieces close to each other, and the magnets will do the rest. Even then, pushing them apart releases the magnets as the buckle is unlatched. Simple and effective. It’s not magic, but certainly magical. It’s also stealthy. Look at the photo above – no one will know you’re hiding such cool technology right in plain sight.

The secret buckle mechanism of the Groove Belt from Groove Life

The secret buckle mechanism of the Groove Belt from Groove Life

Setting up the belt

First time use does require a bit of setup. Their sizing guide will get you in the ballpark, but final adjustments are made by the end user. Simply thread the belt through the buckle to set the desired length. It took me a few tries to find the sweet spot. Unlike those old belts with holes, there is no compromise. It shouldn’t ever be too tight or loose, since there are no hard stops (holes) for adjustment. Once that’s set, the excess can be tucked under the keeper loop. The webbing is so thin, it will fit in belt loops even when doubled up.

Actual use

Had I gotten this belt during the warmer months, it would not have gotten much use. Working from home meant shorts, flip-flops, and pocket carry for those rare trips out of the house. Once it cooled off, I switched to jeans, actual shoes, and IWB carry. My jeans are sized a bit big for motorcycle riding and concealed carry, yet the belt held m pants up whether or not I was carrying. And although I like all the features of the Groove Belt, the fact that it fits through my belt loops is huge. No need to remove the buckle or latch, like on some other belts. That’s not a deal-breaker for those other brands, but clearly, it doesn’t need to be that way.

My black belt with Gun Metal buckle paired well with faded jeans, which is what I wore most of the time. But like just about everyone else last year, I had to attend more than one funeral. Not that I could find my dress belt (I didn’t even try), but the Groove Belt didn’t look out of place with black dress pants and a black shirt. Versatility. Also, if you’re a minimalist, you can probably get by with one well-chosen belt for casual or formal attire.

Conclusion

One of my nicknames is “Grumpy”. And it probably describes me pretty well sometimes. It takes a bit to get me enthused. So if I’m praising something, it’s because it’s genuinely praise-worthy. The Groove Belt is one of those rare products that exceeds my expectations. And by a large margin. It holds up my pants, just like any other belt. More importantly, I can size it to the exact length I want. I can adjust the belt to keep my pants up with or without a little single stack tucked in at the hip. Its extra little give provides all day comfort. Somehow, it even manages to look good with casual and dress clothes. There are no moving parts to fail, and a 94 year warranty. All that for $49.95, is very hard to beat. Check it out at Groovelife.com.

I’d like to thank Groove Life for providing their belt for this review, and saving the world from seeing my butt crack. Questions? Comments? Have any of our readers tried this belt? What do you think of them? Feel free to share below.